Message: “Fanfare” from Angela Tipps

A message from the series “Music at St. Paul\’s.” The newly installed trumpet en chamade and chimes weigh approximately 900 pounds and are hung some 18 feet above the ground. This set was assembled in Quebec, dismantled, transported, and reassembled here.
The St. Pauls organ will be showcased in our Fanfare performances.

Permission to stream the music obtained from ONE LICENSE with license #A-731767. All rights reserved.

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Message: “The Three Sopranos” from Angela Tipps

A message from the series “Music at St. Paul\’s.” You’ve heard of The Three Tenors? Well, here are The Three Sopranos–Chris Brosend, Amanda O’Connor, and Emily Kent–providing some beautiful music as we wait for the Christ Child to be born.

Permission to stream the music obtained from ONE LICENSE with license #A-731767. All rights reserved.

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Message: ““X” marks the spot” from The Rev. Dr. Kristine Blaess

A message from the series “Sermons during Advent.” The salvation of the world – this universal message of good news – is found in particularity. All of creation has come to this one point — this voice, crying in the wilderness, and to this moment that is just before us. God is just about to come dwell with us, God incarnate in a baby, laid in a manger because there was no room in the inn. And God, in Jesus, hanging on the cross, because through his death and resurrection real peace comes into the world.

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Message: ““Stand Up!”” from The Rev. Michael Whitnah

A message from the series “Sermons during Advent.” Advent begins in darkness. In the midst of woes, signs of distress and fear and foreboding, Jesus invites his disciples to raise their heads and stand tall. To run with confidence the race marked out for them. We run with confidence, not in ourselves, but in the One who is coming on the clouds, in power and glory.

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Message: ““The Most Wonderful Time of the Year”” from The Rev. Michael Whitnah

A message from the series “Sermons during Pentecost.” When will this be, and what will be the sign that all these things are about to be accomplished? We live in a world of profound longing, longing for the world to be set right. In the midst of alarming times, Jesus exhorts his disciples: do not be deceived, and do not be alarmed. Why? Because even, now, God is drawing near to us.

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Message: “Keeping company with the saints” from The Rev. Dr. Kristine Blaess

A message from the series “Sermons during Pentecost.” Jesus cried with a loud voice, ‘Lazarus, come out!’ The dead man came out, his hands and feet bound with strips of cloth, and his face wrapped in a cloth. Jesus said to them, ‘Unbind him, and let him go.’ John 11.43-44

This is no impersonal God, no impersonal kingdom. This is God who looks at us and loves us, God who sinks down next to us in our weeping, God who bids us raise our eyes to him in thanksgiving. This is God who calls us to “Come out!” and raises us to the new life that is on the other side of grief, of depression, and of death.

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Message: “On Bach and Hesed” from The Rev. Michael Whitnah

A message from the series “Sermons during Pentecost.” The story of Ruth is set in “the days when the judges ruled.” These were desperate days, when everyone did what was right in their own eyes, and the very fabric of society was ripped apart. Yet, even then, hope remains. When the people of God choose, like Ruth, to reflect the character of God in their most immediate and intimate relationships, there will always be hope.

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Message: ““The Game Plan” from The Rev. Michael Whitnah

A message from the series “Sermons during Pentecost.” There is no way to be an authentic disciple of Jesus without keeping our minds and our hearts focused on the Cross of our Lord. First, in adoration and thanksgiving for the abundant life he has won for us, and second, as a model for our own self-emptying service in this broken world, a world ruled by power and oppression. The Cross is the glory of God revealed, because it is where the love of God is on fullest display.

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